Freescale Technology Forum (FTG) Americas


Attendees: 1,800
Location: Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Center, Dallas, TX

Freescale has a vision for a world of connected intelligence and their annual Freescale Technology Forum is one way they’re working to make that a reality. In our eight years of working on the event, InVision has helped reinforce their position as a true thought leader and collaborator in the embedded semiconductor industry space.

Know Your Audience and Objectives
This developer’s conference gathers imaginative minds for four days of accelerated learning sessions, inspiring content and collaboration. The attendees are inventors, both independents and employees of companies who use embedded semiconductor chips in their products – so this is a heady group, always thinking and searching for new ideas. In this environment, Freescale has the opportunity to reach these developers directly, Freescale offers technical training, introduces their latest innovations and showcases their newest product success stories in industrial, consumer, and automotive technologies.

Design with Purpose
At the Freescale Technology Forum, content is always king. While Freescale developed creative for this year that would compel and excite, we worked closely with their internal team to accomplish feats of production that made it all hit home. The theme was “Making the world a smarter place.” To that end, we cooked up some smart technology of our own to help showcase theirs, including a projection-mapped screen surface and a series of automated trolleys that transported demos on- and off-stage for their reveals. Staging and clever camera work also kept up interest during product demonstrations, as did roving reporters.

Measure for Success
A milestone for the FTF’s short-term success is social media, which is monitored during and after the event – and the results were great. The spirit of the conference continued online, with numerous tweets from attendees sharing ideas, demos, interests and event highlights. After the conference, Freescale expects to see a boost in the use of their products, as a part of their longer-term event measurement.

In the short-term, we wrapped up the event with an engaged, enthusiastic audience and a happy client – and we’re all looking forward to translating the FTF experience for China and India.

It’s All in the Wrist

Apple Watch

Photo Credit: (Reuters/Stephen Lam)

All everyone has been talking about lately is Apple’s new interactive Watch coming out early 2015. And, of course, they didn’t just make one watch. That would’ve been too simple. Instead, they made three watches: Apple Watch, Apple Sport and Apple Watch Edition. For the person who doesn’t mind wearing something on their wrist, the Apple Watch might be perfect for you.

The 38mm – 44 mm watch with retina display does almost anything imaginable. In addition to it being able to answer calls, check emails, listen to music, see photos and give directions; it also has quite a few attractive highlights.

Some Highlights

  • Sending texts with words is not the only option. You can sketch your message and your friend on the other end can watch it animate.
  • With Passbook, you can store your credit and debit cards, boarding passes and tickets – and even use your Apple Watch to pay at participating stores.
  • Apple found a way to give technology “a more human touch.” Whenever you receive an alert or notification, you will feel a tactile (but subtle) sensation.
  • You can visually see your heartbeat and actually send it to someone to show them how you feel.
  • For fitness fanatics, tracking steps, calories and your heart rate is just the start; a “Stand ring” tracks how often you’ve stood and  reminds you to move around a bit.
  • Using additional app software, you can control the temperature in your home and turn your lights on and off.

So how can we leverage the technology Apple has created into our live events? Once app developers get their hands on this, it’s only a matter of time until new apps will be created to enhance the Apple Watch experience even more: networking, gamification, data gathering and even gesture technology.

How will you use it?

Build It and They Will Come





Visionary Walt Disney was a smart man and a master of both observation and action. One of the most powerful lessons he taught was, “You don’t build it for yourself. You know what the people want and you build it for them.”

I recently read an article from the Disney Institute based on this very lesson called, Leadership Lessons from Walt Disney: Perfecting the Customer Experience.

What struck me in this article was this particular paragraph: “OK, so how can we truly know what the people want? The simple answer is to treat them as though they are guests in our own homes, and ask them face-to-face… not by a survey or on-line chat. Think about it. We would never welcome guests into our own home for a dinner party and then ‘manage the event’ from across the street, or even across the hallway. No, we would join in the mix and ask our guests what they would like to drink, or eat, or watch on television.”

In today’s technology-driven world, we rely heavily on providing feedback behind a facade, which we all call online. One could argue that people are more honest in anonymous feedback or the protection of their computer; however, face-to-face interaction makes an experience more personal and genuine. It also gives you a well-rounded, in-depth understanding of what your attendees actually want. With the right kind of people asking the questions – ones who  are unbiased and friendly – human connections can encourage people to want to talk about their feelings and perspectives. Even if you don’t have someone asking attendees questions, you can have these scouts milling around an event to hear what people are saying and observing their behavior. Being among the crowd will provide you with better actionable insight than an online survey or feedback forum ever could. It also gives you the chance to be the attendee. Only then can you experience exactly what your attendees are experiencing.

So how do you know what your attendees want? In Walt’s words: “Get out there, be willing to listen, and then institutionalize learning and continuous improvement on behalf of your customers [read: attendees].”